Speed in miles per hour.
04/09/2012 9:04:15 AM
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Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 609
I teach math and usually have a few track athletes in my class. I like to have them calculate their average speed in their events in miles per hour (and, just because I'm a jerk, in furlongs per fortnight). I thought some of the athletes on here might be interested in knowing their speed in miles per hour so I'll give you an easy formula. (Distance of race/time in seconds)*2.237 gives you speed in miles per hour. So if you run a 100 meter dash in 12 seconds then (100/12)*2.237 = about 18.64 miles per hour. For the record you need only multiply your answer in mph by 2688 to get your speed in furlongs per fortnight.(Multiply by 336 to change hours to fortnights, then multiply by 8 to change miles to furlongs) I don't give my students formulas for this; they have to do the conversions. (Have to know to multiply by 3600 to change from meters per second to meters per hour and to divide by 1609.344. Some of my students are disappointed to find they can't speed in a residential neighborhood (You'd have to run a 100 in about 8.9 seconds to go over 25 mph), but this is an average speed and I suppose it's possible that some Olympian might achieve an instantaneous speed that fast). Anyway, I know this is a little silly, but it is high school (and middle school) track we're talking about here. Might as well try to teach a little math with our sport. P.S. I also love using your track and cross country times as data in my statistics classes. (example: If a girl in Virginia runs 3200 meters in 11 minutes and 59 seconds, how many standard deviations is she from the mean if the population is the SB reported for all runners on MileStat in the Commonwealth District in 2011?)
I teach math and usually have a few track athletes in my class. I like to have them calculate their average speed in their events in miles per hour (and, just because I'm a jerk, in furlongs per fortnight).

I thought some of the athletes on here might be interested in knowing their speed in miles per hour so I'll give you an easy formula.

(Distance of race/time in seconds)*2.237 gives you speed in miles per hour.

So if you run a 100 meter dash in 12 seconds then (100/12)*2.237 = about 18.64 miles per hour.

For the record you need only multiply your answer in mph by 2688 to get your speed in furlongs per fortnight.(Multiply by 336 to change hours to fortnights, then multiply by 8 to change miles to furlongs)

I don't give my students formulas for this; they have to do the conversions. (Have to know to multiply by 3600 to change from meters per second to meters per hour and to divide by 1609.344.

Some of my students are disappointed to find they can't speed in a residential neighborhood (You'd have to run a 100 in about 8.9 seconds to go over 25 mph), but this is an average speed and I suppose it's possible that some Olympian might achieve an instantaneous speed that fast). Anyway, I know this is a little silly, but it is high school (and middle school) track we're talking about here. Might as well try to teach a little math with our sport.

P.S. I also love using your track and cross country times as data in my statistics classes. (example: If a girl in Virginia runs 3200 meters in 11 minutes and 59 seconds, how many standard deviations is she from the mean if the population is the SB reported for all runners on MileStat in the Commonwealth District in 2011?)
04/09/2012 1:57:34 PM
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Joined: May 2009
Posts: 85
@mattymath Thanks for sharing. I used the formula you provided for Usain Bolt's 9.58 100, which is approximately 23.4 miles per hour. So I suppose he would be speeding if he ran that time in a 5 mile per hour zone, in a parking garage for example.
@mattymath Thanks for sharing. I used the formula you provided for Usain Bolt's 9.58 100, which is approximately 23.4 miles per hour. So I suppose he would be speeding if he ran that time in a 5 mile per hour zone, in a parking garage for example.
04/10/2012 11:43:26 AM
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Joined: Feb 2006
Posts: 85
Sounds like you make your classes fun.
Sounds like you make your classes fun.
04/11/2012 3:07:51 PM
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Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 609
The kids hate it when I break out the cross country times. LOL. They have to change every time from minutes and seconds to seconds.
The kids hate it when I break out the cross country times. LOL. They have to change every time from minutes and seconds to seconds.
04/13/2012 8:24:31 AM
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Posts: 11
I use similar calculations to project percent effort changes and equivalents for my distance runners. It's easy to say, "Do the workout @ 85% effort," but most kids have no idea what that means. Putting in terms of distance per unit time (mph, fps, mps, etc.) makes the idea easier to get across and allows you to give them specific split times to hit in workouts. There are a number of theories & compilations/% effort tables out there. One that I stumbled across recently suggest that, for 800M runners, you take their best 400M time, convert to distance/time, & then project 93% effort for the 1st lap of an all-out 800 & 89% for the 2nd lap. For example, if you have a kid whose best all-out 400 is 60 seconds, that converts to 6.67 m/s. 93% of that is 6.2 m/s which converts back to a 64.5 second 1st lap. Doing the same math @ 89% yields a 67.4 second 2nd lap for a total time of 2:11.9. Likewise, a 55 second kid should be able to run a 2:00.9 while a 65 second kid should be able to run a 2:22.9. Like all theoretical calculations, this one is somewhat of a generalization, but, in my experience, it seems to hold fairly true. My all-time favorite, though, is the scoring table built by Dr. Gerry Purdy & James Gardner (Google gerry purdy scoring tables) where in Purdy uses a fairly complicated (but understandable) methodology to assign a point level to a given performance at a given distance. From that baseline, with slight variations to account for natural ability (i.e., fast twitch, slow twitch, leg turnover), given a performance at one distance, you can generally predict performance at another distance so long as it's fairly close to the 1st (i.e., don't try to predict an athlete's 1600M time using their best 100M time). Interested in feedback about this. Coach Chic Woodgrove
I use similar calculations to project percent effort changes and equivalents for my distance runners. It's easy to say, "Do the workout @ 85% effort," but most kids have no idea what that means. Putting in terms of distance per unit time (mph, fps, mps, etc.) makes the idea easier to get across and allows you to give them specific split times to hit in workouts. There are a number of theories & compilations/% effort tables out there. One that I stumbled across recently suggest that, for 800M runners, you take their best 400M time, convert to distance/time, & then project 93% effort for the 1st lap of an all-out 800 & 89% for the 2nd lap. For example, if you have a kid whose best all-out 400 is 60 seconds, that converts to 6.67 m/s. 93% of that is 6.2 m/s which converts back to a 64.5 second 1st lap. Doing the same math @ 89% yields a 67.4 second 2nd lap for a total time of 2:11.9. Likewise, a 55 second kid should be able to run a 2:00.9 while a 65 second kid should be able to run a 2:22.9. Like all theoretical calculations, this one is somewhat of a generalization, but, in my experience, it seems to hold fairly true.

My all-time favorite, though, is the scoring table built by Dr. Gerry Purdy & James Gardner (Google gerry purdy scoring tables) where in Purdy uses a fairly complicated (but understandable) methodology to assign a point level to a given performance at a given distance. From that baseline, with slight variations to account for natural ability (i.e., fast twitch, slow twitch, leg turnover), given a performance at one distance, you can generally predict performance at another distance so long as it's fairly close to the 1st (i.e., don't try to predict an athlete's 1600M time using their best 100M time).

Interested in feedback about this.

Coach Chic
Woodgrove
04/13/2012 11:22:12 AM
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Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 29
this table you speak of sounds very similar to v-dots that we use as a measure of ability. your race V-dot can even compute to interval, tempo, and other kinds of workouts. i find the v-dot table very handy for determining goal paces during workouts and predicting race times.
this table you speak of sounds very similar to v-dots that we use as a measure of ability. your race V-dot can even compute to interval, tempo, and other kinds of workouts. i find the v-dot table very handy for determining goal paces during workouts and predicting race times.
04/13/2012 2:39:30 PM
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Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 609
@allidoisrun [url=http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/]Your text to link here...[/url] I like the running calculator at this site. The conversions are pretty good but I think it expects times to be a little too fast at longer distances, but it's pretty good if you want to get some quick ideas of at what pace you might want to run some various types of workouts. I should point out that I'm not a distance coach so I haven't tried this with athletes, but I LIKE the calculator.
@allidoisrun

Your text to link here...

I like the running calculator at this site. The conversions are pretty good but I think it expects times to be a little too fast at longer distances, but it's pretty good if you want to get some quick ideas of at what pace you might want to run some various types of workouts.

I should point out that I'm not a distance coach so I haven't tried this with athletes, but I LIKE the calculator.
02/29/2020 10:58:27 AM
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06/18/2020 12:07:22 PM
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